Seeing at the Speed of Sound

Lipreading, which makes one sense do the work of another, is a skill daunting to describe. Rachel Kolb, ’12, deaf since birth, shares its mysteries.

By Rachel Kolb

I am sitting in my office during a summer internship. Absorbed by my computer screen, I do not notice when my manager enters the room, much less when he starts talking. Only when a sudden hand taps my shoulder do I jump. He is gazing expectantly at me.

“I’m sorry, I didn’t hear you come in,” I say.

“Oh, right.” His expression changes: to surprise, and then to caution. He proceeds to say something that looks like, “Would you graawl blub blub vhoom mwarr hreet twizzolt, please?” I haven’t the faintest idea what he said. I have no excuse, for I was looking straight at him. But despite my attention, something went wrong. He spoke too fast; my eyes lost focus.

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A10s refueled by KC 135 Stratotanker

You may have seen mid-air refueling before and admired thepilots that fly up to the KC-135, but check out who and how gets the job done on the KC-135.

Video by Staff Sgt. Robert Barne| 124th Fighter Wing
190th Fighter Squadron A-10 Thunderbolt II’s performing air to air refueling from a KC-135

Stop Being Offended Today: The Cure For Everything That Irritates You

From DumbLittleMan:

There is an epidemic spreading across the world.
And I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but we’re all carriers of the disease.
It’s called Offend-initis, a skin condition whereby the thickness of our skin melts away to the point where everything offends us.
Symptoms may include: hurt feelings, indignation, irritability, disappointment, grumpiness and an all-around allergic reaction to anyone who says or does something we don’t like.
Fortunately, there is a cure.

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The Complete Guide To America’s Jobs Crisis And The Failure Of Monetary Policy Using Animated Gifs

From Business Insider:

Author Mike Konczal helpfully uses animated .gifs to simply break down the most critical theoretical debate of our time.

Warning: A few of the gifs have some salty language in the text.

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Are you still here? Go read (and watch) the thing. Hilariously troubling.

Difference Engine: The PC all over again?

From The Economist:

WHAT could well be the next great technological disruption is fermenting away, out of sight, in small workshops, college labs, garages and basements. Tinkerers with machines that turn binary digits into molecules are pioneering a whole new way of making things—one that could well rewrite the rules of manufacturing in much the same way as the PC trashed the traditional world of computing.
The machines, called 3D printers, have existed in industry for years. But at a cost of $100,000 to $1m, few individuals could ever afford one. Fortunately, like everything digital, their price has fallen. So much so, industrial 3D printers can now be had for $15,000, and home versions for little more than $1,000 (or half that in kit form). “In many ways, today’s 3D printing community resembles the personal computing community of the early 1990s,” says Michael Weinberg, a staff lawyer at Public Knowledge, an advocacy group in Washington, DC.

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How To Make An Electricity-Free Refrigerator

How To Make an Electricity-Free Refrigerator

From Gizmodo:

Conventional refrigeration does an incredible job keeping food fresh. But that technology hasn’t helped desert dwellers without steady electricity. A more recent development in refrigeration—the Zeer pot-in-pot refrigerator—only requires water, sand, and a hot, dry climate to preserve produce through evaporative cooling. Here’s how to make the simple gadget.

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Which USA do you work in?

The often thought-provoking Mark Cuban on our brick-and-mortar vs. digital worlds.

Good stuff.